International Policies

Vatican City Is Smaller Than a Golf Course. So Why Is It Treated Like a Country at the U.N.?

This week, the United Nations (U.N.) Committee on the Rights of the Child, the panel tasked with monitoring compliance to the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, issued a scathing report against the Vatican. The committee urged the Holy See to take responsibility for child molestation among Catholic priests; to amend canon law to allow abortions in some circumstances, such as to protect the life of a young mother; and to ensure that sex education, including access to information about contraception, is mandatory in Catholic schools.

The Holy See has a longstanding history of obstructing reproductive health and rights in U.N. processes and agreements, as well as a surprising amount of influence there. While this latest report is good news, there is some concern over the role the Holy See could play in the negotiating of the post-2015 development agenda later this year.

Watch this video from Catholics for Choice to learn about the Holy See’s dangerous, outsize privileges at the U.N. and why we need to “See Change.” Or just watch it for the adorable, disgruntled Pope figurine (it’s totally worth it).

2 Responses to “Vatican City Is Smaller Than a Golf Course. So Why Is It Treated Like a Country at the U.N.?”

  1. Andrew

    Why? Mechanical cause: history. Proximal Cause: When the UN was formed they were there. Formal Cause: the Holy See IS the ROMAN EMPIRE, the oldest continuous government in the Western World. Final Cause: they want to be able to influence policy, which is why they pulled strings in mechanical and proximal cause dimensions.

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  2. Ed Patton

    In previous letters to the editor I have suggested a million women march on the Vatican for a variety of reasons.The two top reasons are for worldwide womens rights and for a change in their position on contraception,abortion and family planning. All that is needed is someone like Melinda Gates and we can speed this along at warp speed.Never doubt!!! This would send notice to the religions of the world and embolden women everwhere. For that matter,this self regulating organism called Earth is crying out for our attention.In Alan Weisman’s recent book “Countdown”(our last best hope for a future on Earth) there is absolutely no
    time to waste to bring the Earth into balance. He is also the author of “The World Without Us”
    Letter to Editor 1/26/14 Published 2/1/14
    Yakima Herald Republic From: Ed Patton
    1304 So 16th Ave
    Yakima WA 98902 509-2481838

    Musing on Eternity
    I have heard a lot about heaven in my lifetime and
    the more I hear the less it intrigues me. I prefer “infinity” where eternal unfolding of the cosmos is occurring .We are so intricately interwoven in
    an eternity that is longer than life everlasting.
    I am inclined to believe we are “spirit” having a human experience rather than human having a spiritual experience.
    “We” have a heavenly opportunity to make a difference on our trek here on Earth.
    Example: Oxfam reported that 85 people on the planet have amassed financial wealth equal to the wealth of 3.5 billion people.
    “We” created this! God, itself, ordained “all” of us to fix it.( An
    economic model not dependent on increasing human numbers is needed).
    A convergence of ecological events are threatening our finite planet and begging for attention. By unloading a lot of hand-me-down, limiting, unenlightened ways of doing business, change will come. By changing our minds we can change the outcome.
    This organism we call Earth is yearning for our rapt attention. Mark Twain once said; “kindness” is the language the blind can see and the deaf can hear. We must be ”kinder” to our mother Earth or else.

    Note: You have permission to reprint any of my comments. ED Patton 1509-2481838 Yakima Wa.

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